Alexander Crawford
Personal Information
Born: 1842 (1842)
Place of Birth: {{{place of birth}}}
Died: March 17 (2021-03-18) 1886 (aged 43–44)
Place of Death: {{{place of death}}}
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Birth Name: {{{birth name}}}
Other Information
Allegiance: United States of America
Union
Participation(s): {{{participations}}}
Branch: United States Navy
Union Navy
Service Years: {{{service years}}}
Rank: Fireman
Service number : {{{servicenumber}}}
Unit: USS Wyalusing
Commands:
Battles: American Civil War
Awards: Medal of Honor
Relations: {{{relations}}}
Other work: {{{otherwork}}}


Alexander Crawford (1842 – March 17, 1886) was a sailor in the United States Navy who served in the American Civil War. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the war.

Biography[edit | edit source]

Crawford was born in 1842 in Pennsylvania. He served as a fireman on the USS Wyalusing during the Civil War. On May 25, 1864, while the Wyalusing was sailing the Roanoke River, Crawford and fellow crewmembers Charles H. Baldwin, John Lafferty, Benjamin Lloyd, and John W. Lloyd volunteered for a mission to destroy the Confederate ironclad Albermarle. The mission failed, but the men evaded capture and eventually made it back to the Wyalusing. For their actions, the five men were each awarded the Medal of Honor.

Alexander Crawford died on March 17, 1886 and was buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Medal of Honor citation[edit | edit source]

Alexander Crawford's official Medal of Honor citation reads as follows:

On board the U.S.S. Wyalusing, Crawford volunteered May 25, 1864, in a night attempt to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle in the Roanoke River. Taking part in a plan to explode the rebel ram Albemarle, Crawford executed his part in the plan with perfection, but upon being discovered, was forced to abandon the plan and retire leaving no trace of the evidence. After spending two hazardous days and nights without food, he gained the safety of a friendly ship and was then transferred back to the Wyalusing. Though the plan failed his skill and courage in preventing detection were an example of unfailing devotion to duty.

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Army Center of Military History.


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