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Charles H. Marsh
[[Image:Charles H. Marsh|center|200px|border]]Charles H. Marsh
Personal Information
Born: 1840
Place of Birth: {{{place of birth}}}
Died: January 25, 1867 (aged 26–27)
Place of Death: {{{place of death}}}
Nickname: {{{nickname}}}
Birth Name: {{{birth name}}}
Other Information
Allegiance: United States
Participation(s): {{{participations}}}
Branch: United States Army
Service Years: {{{service years}}}
Rank: Corporal
Service number : {{{servicenumber}}}
Unit: 1st Connecticut Cavalry
Commands: {{{commands}}}
Battles: American Civil War
 • Valley Campaigns of 1864
Awards: Medal of Honor
Relations: {{{relations}}}
Other work: {{{otherwork}}}


Charles H. Marsh (1840 – January 25, 1867) was a Union Army soldier in the American Civil War and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions during a skirmish in the Valley Campaigns of 1864.

Biography[]

Born in Milford, Connecticut in 1840, Marsh was raised in the Lanesville district of New Milford.[1][2] He enlisted in the Army from New Milford on October 21, 1861, and served as a private in Company D of the 1st Connecticut Cavalry.[2][3]

In October 1862, one year after his enlistment, Marsh was captured by Confederates near Haymarket, Virginia. He was found with a letter which indicated to the Confederates that he may be a spy, and he was jailed at Castle Thunder, a facility in Richmond for civilian prisoners and Union agents. Marsh protested to Confederate Secretary of War James Seddon, arguing that the area where he was captured was Union-held, and he should thus be considered a prisoner of war rather than a spy. His argument was rejected, but he was nevertheless released in a prisoner exchange in December of that year.[1]

Marsh rejoined the 1st Connecticut Cavalry and participated in the Valley Campaigns of 1864. On July 31, 1864, in the Back Creek valley of western Virginia, his unit conducted a raid on Confederate General Jubal Anderson Early's troops. During the skirmish, Marsh captured a color bearer and his flag.[1] For these actions, he was awarded the Medal of Honor six months later, on January 23, 1865. His official citation reads "Capture of flag and its bearer."[3]

Marsh took part in the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House of May 1864 and reached the rank of corporal before leaving the military.[1][4] He moved to Pawling, New York, where he died at age 27 of tuberculosis, which he had contracted in the Army.[1][2] He was buried at Quaker Cemetery in New Milford.[4]

Marsh Bridge, spanning the Housatonic River in New Milford, is named in his honor.[2] He is one of only two Milford residents to have received the Medal of Honor, the other being Indian Wars officer George W. Baird.[1]

See also[]

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32x28px American Civil War portal
32x28px United States Army portal

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Juliano, Frank (May 30, 2010). "Civil War Medal of Honor winner had ties to Milford". Connecticut Post (Bridgeport, Connecticut). Archived from the original on May 31, 2010. http://www.webcitation.org/5q9Hh7og6. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Smith, Frances L. (2000). Images of America: New Milford. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. p. 118. ISBN 9780738504506. http://books.google.com/books?id=wNDatUi4hUoC&pg=PA118&dq=charles+marsh. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients (A–L)". Medal of Honor citations. United States Army Center of Military History. August 3, 2009. http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/civwarmz.html. Retrieved May 31, 2010. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Charles H. Marsh (1840 - 1867)". Find a Grave. September 5, 2003. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=7836724. Retrieved May 31, 2010. 
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