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James Lawrence Lardner (20 November 1802 – 12 April 1881) was an officer in the United States Navy during the American Civil War.

Biography[]

Born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Lardner was appointed Midshipman 10 May 1820. Lardner served in the Pacific Squadron from 1821 to 1824 and joined the Mediterranean Squadron in 1825 after escorting General Lafayette in Brandywine back to France. He cruised in various squadrons and held important positions on shore until 1860.

In September 1861 during the Civil War, Lardner, in command of frigate Susquehanna, took a pertinent part in the Battle of Port Royal and the capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard. He was commended for gallantry in action by Rear Admiral Samuel F. Du Pont; his name was sent to Congress for a vote of thanks by President Abraham Lincoln. In May 1862, be assumed command of the East Gulf Blockading Squadron and was promoted to commodore 16 July 1862. From May 1863 to October 1864, Lardner commanded the West India Squadron.

After his retirement 20 November 1864, he was appointed rear admiral 25 July 1866. He served on special duty with various boards until 1869, when he was appointed Governor of the Naval Asylum, Philadelphia. He held this post until 1871.

Lardner died 12 April 1881 in Philadelphia.

Namesakes[]

Two ships have been named USS Lardner for him.

Trivia[]

It was because of James Lawrence Lardner that one of his nephews came to be known as Ring Lardner: James Lardner was a friend of Cadwalader Ringgold, another Navy officer who also became a rear admiral. James Lardner named one of his sons "Ringgold Wilmer Lardner", and James' brother gave the exact same name to his own son after the newborn's cousin. Ring Lardner never liked his given name and shortened it, yet he "lost the battle" when his son, Ring Lardner Jr. was named after him.[1]

References[]

  1. [1] Web page titled "Lardnerfamily:mania/The Lardners/Part One: From England to Michigan/Updated 25 March 2006", accessed October 19, 2006
This article includes text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.
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